Friday Fives, Friday the 13th edition.

Some of the 5 worst times to get a low

(Is there ever a good time to get a low?)

5.  After brushing your teeth.  Colgate + Juice of choice/glucose tabs does not = tasty.

4.  In the middle of the night.  I hate getting out of my comfy snuggly bed to treat a low.  And the 15-15-15 rule goes out the window at 3am, leading to early morning highs and a day of feeling like doodie.

3.  After eating a big meal.  You’re already full and you have to eat/drink more?  *unbuttons pants*

2.  During/Before/After exercise.  It drives me bonkers when I’m all geared up to work out or riding the high of endorphins after a good sweat session and I have to reverse all my hard work to treat a low.

1.  During sex.  ‘Nuff said.

 

Have a wonderful weekend!

Blue and organization!

Slacking on my Diabetes Month Photo-a-Day posts!

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I may not always wear blue on Fridays (I really try though!) but I always make sure I sport my “Cure Type 1 Diabetes” bracelet! Thanks JDRF!

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My pump supplies cubbie. Don’t worry, I just placed an order today!

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My test strips/extra Rxs/Random D stuff drawer. Anyone want to have a BG testing party?

Sadly, I don’t have a fun spot for my Dexcom supplies.  They just stay in their box in the bottom of my closet.  I feel I need a cute (blue) basket for them!

Proud.

Day 4 of Diabetes Month Photo-a-Day is “Proud”.  I think that people who live with diabetes (and our awesome Type 3-ers) have a lot to be proud of every day.  This isn’t an easy disease to manage.  We constantly have to juggle, do math, chase highs and lows, etc.  It can be exhausting and every day is a victory!

But for the purpose of this Photo-a-Day entry, I want to share a picture of me after one of my training runs.  I have completed two half marathons – The Virginia Beach Rock N Roll in September 2010 and the Flying Pirate (Outer Banks) in April 2011.  Granted my times were pretty pathetic (Running is so not my thing) but I did it, managed my blood sugars along the way, and got the medals to prove it.  I think this goes to show that even people who aren’t the best athletes can set a physical goal and achieve it.  Thumbs up to you!

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After one of my training runs for the Flying Pirate Half – notice I’m wearing my Rock N Roll half shirt? (Also, can I move back to the Outer Banks? Oh how I miss living on the water…)

He ate it anyway.

Got home from work today and the Hubs (who works from home) was still on a conference call.  He popped his head out of his office and told me he has another call until 6:30 and if I don’t want to wait until then to eat to go ahead and start dinner.  (He usually cooks.  He rocks.)  I make the executive decision to make a gourmet meal of brinner (bacon and cheddar omelets, hash browns, toast, and some more bacon).  Yum.

My sister called me and since it seems like I haven’t talked to her in forever (really, it’s been like 2 days, but that’s a super long time for us!) I took the call while attempting to make my awesome, I-can’t-believe-she-works-full-time-and-puts-meals-like-this-on-the-table, meal.  Maybe that’s why I didn’t notice that I was in the middle of an out of nowhere, Shelby-style low.  “This one hit her (me) fast”.  My trusty Dexcom was in my bag, on vibrate.  D’oops.

Hung up with the sis and check my BG in anticipation of pre-bolusing.  40.  YIKES.  In my low fog I thought it was a good idea to finish making dinner, which, of course, dumb idea.  I am not so good at cooking meals in which there are many components (casseroles are my specialty).  I can never get the timing down.  So my lame cooking skills in addition to my low BG made for tonight’s dinner prep to be more of an extreme sport than I anticipated.

So as you can imagine, dinner got nasty burnt, but my husband ate it anyway.  And also lectured me to turn off the stove and step out of the kitchen next time while I treat.  I think I will listen to him.

 

 

August Blog Carnival…

Diabetes is a condition that affects more than just our bodies, it influences our emotions as well.  It can sometimes feel harder to cope with the emotional aspects of diabetes then the physical demands.  With that in mind, we revisit the “Diabetes and Mental Health”  chat from July 24th and ask:

What can a parent of a child with diabetes, or a person with diabetes, do to help reduce the emotional impact of caring for diabetes?

Oh, diabetes.  You impact my emotions on a daily basis.  On any given day you may make me feel:

  • Frustration.  But I bolused correctly…why is my BG skyrocketing?
  • Anger.  I’m going to have to do this crap for the rest of my life?  Really?
  • Disappointment.  I really wanted to work out today but my BG isn’t behaving.  Or, I just worked out and my BG has dropped causing me to consume calories making me feel like my workout was a waste of time.
  • Fear.  Will I go low overnight and not feel it?
  • Tired.  I am sick of dealing with insurance companies, BG checks, so many doctor’s appointments.  I just want to be normal.
  • Empowered.  My BG has been perfect all day.  I can do this!
  • Strong.  If I can handle diabetes, I can handle anything.

For me, in order to reduce the emotional impact of diabetes, I try to focus on my last bullet point – strength.  Diabetes sucks.  BUT, it’s not going away.  When I’m feeling particularly overwhelmed by all the disease entails emotionally, financially, and physically, I try to remind myself that I have a choice.  I can choose to be miserable and feel sorry for myself or I can choose to accept that this is my reality and I need to deal with it and keep moving forward.  Sure, the pity party sometimes wins out.  I am human, after all.  But choosing to be happy and accept this leads to many more positive days than negative.

My advice for those Type 3s in our lives – focus on the positive.  Remind your PWD how awesome they are and how proud of them you are.  Diabetes isn’t easy.  It feels good to get that pat on the back or high-five and a “you’re doing a great job”.  Don’t harp on us when we’re having a tough day or our BG is being naughty.  Let us throw our tantrum and know that tomorrow will be better and that we are doing our very best.

 

I confess…

I’ve been cheating on the DOC with Reddit.  Does anyone else read the Diabetes sub-reddit?  I really enjoy it.  Check it out!

After my awesome A1c results last week I, of course, had to share with my Reddit friends.  One person asked me to list 10 changes I’ve made to make such an improvement in my A1c (I went from 7.9 in April to 6.8 now, however a year ago, I was 8.7!)  Of course the first thing I thought when this person asked was: “Blog Post!”  I love to make lists.  If you ask the hubs, I make them for him pretty frequently – 10 Reasons why I miss him while he’s away (there’s no one around to kill spiders!), 10 reasons why I am excited for the weekend (Sitting on my butt is better than working, duh!), etc.  The lists.  I make them.

So, without further ado, here are 10 changes I made to improve my A1c:

1. I switched to sugar-free flavored creamer. When I first got my CGM I noticed that I was spiking big time after breakfast, even if I was bolusing to cover the carbs. Not willing to give up coffee, I switched to SF creamer and that has helped a lot.

2. I also gave up cereal. I eat a bagel and cream cheese for breakfast most mornings. I should have more protein but so far I’m doing OK, blood sugar-wise.

3. Getting the CGM period. It’s been amazing to know what my BG is doing at any given moment. I’ve been very attentive to it and adjusting my insulin when needed to keep me in range.

4. Baby-stepping my high alert on the CGM down. It started at 200 and I’ve gradually gotten it down to 160.  I think if I started with a high alert of 160 right out of the gate, I would have gotten frustrated with all the beeping.  If Bob can do it, so can I.

5. Communicating with my CDE a lot! I’m lucky in that she is very receptive to emails. I send her my reports every couple of weeks and she makes small tweaks. She’s noticed patterns I never would have noticed before.  She has quickly become my diabetes care BFF.

6. Getting back on the pump, in general.  For me, it’s much easier to correct those pesky high numbers with a couple mini boluses or temp basal.  A little more difficult and time-consuming to do on MDI.

7. Pre-bolusing for meals. It takes me about 30 minutes to get ready in the morning and halfway through I bolus for breakfast. Since I eat the same thing every day, it makes it easy.  I also pre-bolus for lunch and dinner too and I think it really helps prevent those after meal spikes.

8. Using combo boluses when I eat high fat meals.  I will master you, pizza.  I will.

9. Trying (although not always successful) to cut back on processed foods.

10. Really paying attention to the 15-15-15 rule when I’m low. Although this doesn’t always work (especially over night!).

It honestly hasn’t been a huge lifestyle adjustment or anything. I’ve just made diabetes a priority.  I know that I feel better physically and emotionally when I’m in better control of my blood sugars.