Flat tires, dead sensors, and clueless people…

Oh my!

This past weekend the husband and I traveled to our hometown for a bridal shower and bachelor/bachelorette parties for a wedding we are both in.  The 7 hour car ride up was pretty un-eventful, my blood sugar behaved for the most part.  However, once we arrived my one day old sensor started misbehaving.  It wasn’t giving me a trend arrow and was telling me I was in the 40s when actually I was 184.  I was hoping it’d come back to life, but after an hour or so of this naughty behavior, I got the question marks of death so I yanked it.  Kind of a bummer because I didn’t want to have to deal with the first 24 hours of sensor inaccuracy during the shower and bachelorette party, but, such is a Diabetic’s life.

The shower was lovely, however when I went out to my car to leave, I noticed a flat tire.  Oh boy.  Luckily my in-laws live only a few miles from where the shower was held so I was able to get my car there and they went out of their way to get a new tire for me.  I am so grateful for them for doing this and giving up their entire Saturday afternoon to solve my problem.  They are wonderful!

The bachelorette party was fun – we went to dinner at a Hibachi style restaurant.  However, we did a lot more walking than I anticipated so I was low for a good hour.  This led to one of the women making a comment about me eating a couple of cookies.  Something along the lines of “I can’t believe you’re eating.  Aren’t you full???”  ARGH.  I said that my blood sugar was low and rather than pass out, I had to force a few cookies down my throat even though we just ate.

This same woman also told me her grandfather “died of diabetes”, so as you can imagine my patience with her was wearing thin.  I will never understand why people think that in order to relate to your disease they have to tell a horror story of someone who died from complications or lost a foot or whatever.  These stories are NOT helpful.

I did face a few D-related decisions over the weekend.  To prevent my CGM alarm from going off at the shower since I knew I’d be eating a lot and it would be a guessing game as to how much to bolus, I turned the high alert off.  I stayed in the low to mid 200s pretty much all day, which, not good.  But, it is what it is.  Hindsight is telling me I probably should have done a temp basal, but live and learn!

While getting ready to head out for the bachelorette party I had to decide if I should bring my meter or CGM as both did not fit in my small, going-out purse.  I chose my meter since I was still within the first 24 hours of my sensor and, well, I trust my meter more.

All-in-all it was a good weekend.  Traveling is just tough with diabetes.  This weekend I’m going to visit my dear friend in NYC and I am determined to have a good blood sugar weekend.  I think it will be much easier since I’m obviously much more comfortable with her than I am with a group of women I’ve only met once.  I have my endo appointment on the 14th and I don’t want last weekend and this coming weekend to mess up my a1c!

I have a special guest blog post coming tomorrow, written by the husband.  Stay tuned!

Memories, sweetened through the ages just like wine…

Diabetes Blog Week, Day 3.dblogweek

Today we’re going to share our most memorable diabetes day. You can take this anywhere…. your or your loved one’s diagnosis, a bad low, a bad high, a big success, any day that you’d like to share.

I would be willing to bet that most people feel that their most memorable diabetes day is the day they were diagnosed.  At least for me, that was absolutely the most significant day in my diabetes life.  But, I won’t bore you with the details because you can read about it already.

I would like to share a more recent memorable “diabetes day”, and that is my wedding day.  The Hubs and I have been married for almost 7 months now and leading up to the wedding I was pretty nervous about how my diabetes would behave.  It always seems to be naughty at the worst times.  Seriously, it’s like a toddler throwing a tantrum in church.  I had a horrible fear that I’d have a low or high blood sugar during the ceremony or toasts at the reception, or that my diabetes would be a major focus of the evening and I wouldn’t be able to relax and enjoy myself.  I really didn’t want this, all I wanted was to be a “normal bride”, enjoying her wedding day and being surrounded by her favorite people.

To accomplish this normalcy, I decided to go off the pump a few months before the wedding.  I figured it’d be easier to just take injections rather than figuring out where I was going to put my pump on my dress (although I had a little bit lot of poof to work with!), and plus when you’re unattached, you can almost forget about diabetes.  I didn’t want to have to think about it any more than the bare minimum on my wedding day.  I wanted to focus on my new husband, my friends and family, and the dance floor!  (OK, and a glass or two of wine as well.  Oh, and the CAKE!)

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You wanna fight, diabetes??
(Note. There were no fights at my wedding. However, there was one kick-ass dance off, pictured above).

Mission accomplished.  My sugars were great throughout my wedding day, despite having a horrible cold and a case of nerves.  I tested when needed but wasn’t consumed by it and honestly can’t even remember when I tested (but I know I did, in case you’re reading this my wonderful doctor).  Although this wasn’t a dramatically memorable “diabetes” day, it was absolutely memorable in the sense that I had an uneventful wedding in the diabetes aspect.  I managed my disease and did not allow it to detract from my day.  It was pretty eventful otherwise, because, you know, I got to marry my best buddy.  Even on the best days of our lives, diabetes is still around.  But it doesn’t have to be the memory we take away from these days.

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