He ate it anyway.

Got home from work today and the Hubs (who works from home) was still on a conference call.  He popped his head out of his office and told me he has another call until 6:30 and if I don’t want to wait until then to eat to go ahead and start dinner.  (He usually cooks.  He rocks.)  I make the executive decision to make a gourmet meal of brinner (bacon and cheddar omelets, hash browns, toast, and some more bacon).  Yum.

My sister called me and since it seems like I haven’t talked to her in forever (really, it’s been like 2 days, but that’s a super long time for us!) I took the call while attempting to make my awesome, I-can’t-believe-she-works-full-time-and-puts-meals-like-this-on-the-table, meal.  Maybe that’s why I didn’t notice that I was in the middle of an out of nowhere, Shelby-style low.  “This one hit her (me) fast”.  My trusty Dexcom was in my bag, on vibrate.  D’oops.

Hung up with the sis and check my BG in anticipation of pre-bolusing.  40.  YIKES.  In my low fog I thought it was a good idea to finish making dinner, which, of course, dumb idea.  I am not so good at cooking meals in which there are many components (casseroles are my specialty).  I can never get the timing down.  So my lame cooking skills in addition to my low BG made for tonight’s dinner prep to be more of an extreme sport than I anticipated.

So as you can imagine, dinner got nasty burnt, but my husband ate it anyway.  And also lectured me to turn off the stove and step out of the kitchen next time while I treat.  I think I will listen to him.

 

 

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I confess…

I’ve been cheating on the DOC with Reddit.  Does anyone else read the Diabetes sub-reddit?  I really enjoy it.  Check it out!

After my awesome A1c results last week I, of course, had to share with my Reddit friends.  One person asked me to list 10 changes I’ve made to make such an improvement in my A1c (I went from 7.9 in April to 6.8 now, however a year ago, I was 8.7!)  Of course the first thing I thought when this person asked was: “Blog Post!”  I love to make lists.  If you ask the hubs, I make them for him pretty frequently – 10 Reasons why I miss him while he’s away (there’s no one around to kill spiders!), 10 reasons why I am excited for the weekend (Sitting on my butt is better than working, duh!), etc.  The lists.  I make them.

So, without further ado, here are 10 changes I made to improve my A1c:

1. I switched to sugar-free flavored creamer. When I first got my CGM I noticed that I was spiking big time after breakfast, even if I was bolusing to cover the carbs. Not willing to give up coffee, I switched to SF creamer and that has helped a lot.

2. I also gave up cereal. I eat a bagel and cream cheese for breakfast most mornings. I should have more protein but so far I’m doing OK, blood sugar-wise.

3. Getting the CGM period. It’s been amazing to know what my BG is doing at any given moment. I’ve been very attentive to it and adjusting my insulin when needed to keep me in range.

4. Baby-stepping my high alert on the CGM down. It started at 200 and I’ve gradually gotten it down to 160.  I think if I started with a high alert of 160 right out of the gate, I would have gotten frustrated with all the beeping.  If Bob can do it, so can I.

5. Communicating with my CDE a lot! I’m lucky in that she is very receptive to emails. I send her my reports every couple of weeks and she makes small tweaks. She’s noticed patterns I never would have noticed before.  She has quickly become my diabetes care BFF.

6. Getting back on the pump, in general.  For me, it’s much easier to correct those pesky high numbers with a couple mini boluses or temp basal.  A little more difficult and time-consuming to do on MDI.

7. Pre-bolusing for meals. It takes me about 30 minutes to get ready in the morning and halfway through I bolus for breakfast. Since I eat the same thing every day, it makes it easy.  I also pre-bolus for lunch and dinner too and I think it really helps prevent those after meal spikes.

8. Using combo boluses when I eat high fat meals.  I will master you, pizza.  I will.

9. Trying (although not always successful) to cut back on processed foods.

10. Really paying attention to the 15-15-15 rule when I’m low. Although this doesn’t always work (especially over night!).

It honestly hasn’t been a huge lifestyle adjustment or anything. I’ve just made diabetes a priority.  I know that I feel better physically and emotionally when I’m in better control of my blood sugars.

Sensor conundrum.

Today marks the two week birthday of my current sensor.  *throws confetti*  This frugal diabetic is psyched that I am getting extra life out of this sensor.  I am wearing it on my right thigh, in a location I’ve never even used as a pump infusion site.  I must say, I really like this area of real estate and anticipate my next sensor to be on my left thigh.  Sometimes I forget about it when I’m pulling down my pants for the 9,000 daily trips to the ladies room, but the not painful snag of my pants on the sensor reminds me.  Other than that…absolutely no major issues with this site.  Sensor is accurate, it’s comfortable, I dig it.  Yay!

As much as I love this spot, I have a conundrum.  I feel that the tape is peeling a bit more on my thigh than sites on my belly (Likely due to additional rubbing of clothing, I’m guessing), and my patchwork job to reinforce the tape is not very attractive.  I started the sensor with my donut-hole OpSite Flexifix and have been patching up the corners with squares of IV 3000 as needed.  However, despite this, the sensor is still working and working well.  Fellow CGM-ers…what do you do?  Replace the sensor when the tape gets nasty or keep reinforcing until the sensor finally poops out?

My current plan is to keep the sensor alive as long as possible.  Since Diabetes ain’t cheap to treat, and each sensor costs about $20, I think I can put my vanity aside for a little while in order to save a few bucks.  I suppose starring in that Nair commercial will just have to wait.

She’s got legs, she may as well use them…

realestate

I really need to start doing some sit-ups. Yikes.

Man, two weeks in to pumping and CGM-ing and I already feel like I’m running out of real-estate.   I’ve been sticking to my belly for both, with the exception of using my upper right side of my tooshie for one pump cycle.  Since my boobs get in the way during insertion arms aren’t long enough to reach around to my left side, the upper bum area is limited to the right side.  Until I either become ambidextrous (“I’m not an ambi-inserter!” Name the movie), get really good at yoga, or lose some pounds, it seems the pump will have to be inserted on my belly, right butt cheek, or legs, which I’ve never tried.  I’ve never worn it on my arm either and for me it just doesn’t seem particularly comfortable with the tubing.

However, I decided to be a big girl and try wearing my CGM sensor on my leg.  Even though Dexcom says it should be in the belly only (because this is where they did their testing when getting FDA approval), I’ve read on the interwebs that you can really put it anywhere you feel comfortable.  I’ve heard from a lot of people who wear it on their thighs and love it.  So I’m giving it a whirl!

Insertion was a little weird as I’ve never done it before (that sounds like something a high schooler would say after prom night if you know what I’m sayin’), but other than feeling the needle a little more than I do in my tummy, it was fine.  I have it on my upper right thigh, towards the outside but not so far on the side that I will feel it when I sleep (I’m a side sleeper).  I haven’t noticed it much and it’s nice to not be rubbing against my desk at work.  I’m conscious of it when I use the bathroom as I don’t want to rip it out and be annoyed that I just wasted a sensor.  I used tons of Opsite FlexiFix per my usual and I can see that I will probably need to reinforce my tape in the next few days, simply due to pulling my pants up and down every time I use the ladies’.  There is a little bump under my pants but I think it’s one of those things that unless you know it’s there and know to look for it, you wouldn’t notice.  I’ll be attending my boxing class tonight, but I don’t anticipate it being annoying.

Dream Devices and High Fives

Diabetes Blog week, Wild Card/Day 7

Since I’m a day late with my Day 7 DBlog Week post, I figured I’d answer not only the Day 7 prompt, but would also throw in a wild card.  Double the love.dblogweek

I shall start with the wildcard:

Back by popular demand, let’s revisit this prompt from last year! Tell us what your fantasy diabetes device would be? Think of your dream blood glucose checker, delivery system for insulin or other meds, magic carb counter, etc etc etc. The sky is the limit – what would you love to see?

The obvious answer to this question is a cure.  A close second would be an artificial pancreas (hopefully soon-ish-y? Maybe in “five to ten years”????).  As you all know, I’ve newly re-cyborged myself with a Dexcom G4 and Animas Ping combo.  One of the main reasons for choosing this combo was the fact that Dexcom and Animas are BFFs and hopefully the new Vibe will be available within the next year-ish in the US.  It was just submitted to the FDA so one can cross her fingers, right?  Anyway…here is what I would LOVE as an option on the Ping…I would love it to ask how your BG is trending according to your CGM when it is calculating your bolus.  Are you trending up?  Slightly more insulin.  Rising rapidly?  Uh oh, a bit more insulin!  Falling rapidly, a lot less insulin.  It’d be nice if the Ping took the guess-work out of it!  I am not sure if this is even an option in the Vibe (I admittedly haven’t researched it a whole lot), but it sure would be nice!

Now, on to Day 7: Spread the Love!

As another Diabetes Blog Week draws to a close, let’s reflect on some of the great bloggers we’ve found this week. Give some love to three blog posts you’ve read and loved during Diabetes Blog Week, and tell us why they’re worth reading. Or share three blogs you’ve found this week that are new to you.

This is not an easy prompt!  There are so many great diabetes blogs out there that it is difficult to narrow it down to just 3 posts.  There are so many bloggers that inspire me, make me laugh, and challenge me.

A new blogger I have found is Paul at Type One Fun.  Paul is a 21 year-old college student who was recently diagnosed.  I was also diagnosed while attending college and it is very interesting to me to read about Paul’s experiences as a “newbie”.  He is doing a wonderful job adjusting to his new life with the D.  I especially enjoyed reading about his accomplishments!  Keep up the great work, Paul!

I really enjoy reading blogs from the Type 3-ers – the diabetic caregivers.  It is great to see things through their eyes, especially the parents of diabetics.  While posting about her most memorable diabetes day, Meri, a mother to four sons, three of whom are Type 1,  wrote of a special moment she shared with her husband in which she was able to accept their new lives as parents to three boys with type 1 diabetes.  Her husband reminded her that “We weren’t sent to this earth to be miserable”, very wise words and a wonderful reminder when we are feeling down or overcome by the emotional aspects of this disease.  Thank you for sharing such an intimate memory, Meri.  And for being an advocate not only for your sons but for all of us who have diabetes.

I also love the story Kelly at Diabetesaliciousness tells about her dad getting into a fight with a security guard at a Phillies game when the guard is a big ole moron when it comes to diabetes and bringing food into the old Vet.  Great memory sharing, Kelly!  And kudos to your dad for doing what so many of us want to do when we meet people who are ignorant about diabetes!

I really enjoyed participating in this year’s Diabetes Blog week.  I found some wonderful blogs to follow and loved hearing people’s experiences with diabetes.  I’m looking forward to next year!

A quick note to my (Moody) CGM Sensor

Dear Sensor,

I know, I know.  You are on day 9 of 24/7 work and you’re tired.  Believe me, I get it.  Your fatigue lead to a non-reading of “???” right at bed time last night.  When, I just happened to be running in the 300s (Damn you Cookout milkshake and your heavenly goodness).  I decided to see if perhaps you just needed a nap and would resurrect yourself as I have heard rumors of this happening.  I, being the responsible nervous diabetic (Hey, I just read a story about a 29 year old’s dead in bed death), set my alarm for 1:30 am to check my sugar.  Imagine my surprise when you not only resurrected, but you resurrected accurately!  Only off by 18, woot!  It lives!

But, sensor pal, you seem to have quite the case of the Mondays today (I do too – I am really angry that I didn’t win the powerball and am here, at the j.o.b). You, without consulting me, have decided that last night’s break wasn’t enough and you needed another nap this morning.  Seriously, how tired can you be?  Fine, nap, because, well, I’m at work and don’t have one of your pals around to replace you (mental note, throw spare sensor into my work bag).  You nap, you snore, and all of a sudden !buzz!, you are alive and ready to take on the world!

Or maybe not.  After your miraculous second resurrection, you informed me that my sugar was 274, when in reality it was 199.  That’s it; you are out of the circle of trust today, Sensor!  I will not be trusting your readings until I can replace you.

Wait just a minute.  I just checked my sugar and it’s 139, but you are telling me I’m 144.  Could it be?  Are you back and back for good?  Or are you just going to continue to drive me nuts like a pms-ing 16 year old girl going through a breakup?

What’s it going to be sensor?  Huh?

Fondly,
Your Master

A sillly poem

Diabetes Blog Week – Day 6.

This year Diabetes Art moves up from the Wildcard choices as we all channel our creativity with art in the broadest sense. Do some “traditional” art like drawing, painting, collage or any other craft you enjoy. Or look to the literary arts and perhaps write a d-poem or share and discuss a favorite quote. Groove to some musical arts by sharing a song that inspires you diabetes-wise, reworking some song lyrics with a d-twist, or even writing your own song. Don’t forget dramatic arts too, perhaps you can create a diabetes reality show or play. These are just a starting point today – there are no right or wrong ways to get creative!

A Dia-Poem.
By: Laura

Diabetes you are so dumb.
Making me chew sugarless gum.
All the finger pricks, make me bleed.
But I sure do love all the DBlogs I read!

I was diagnosed as a college freshman.
Immediately, I started putting needles through my skin.
The burning insulin after the poke,
Man, Diabetes, you are no joke!

Diabetes, you make me stand out.
But I refuse to sit around and pout.
Sure you offer extra challenges and work.
Especially when my blood sugar’s being a jerk!

But there is one thing that I need to say,
Without you I wouldn’t be the woman I am today.
You’ve shown me I’m stronger than I think I am.
But seriously, any time you want to, feel free to SCRAM.