15 years.

Today marks 15 years since I was diagnosed with diabetes.  During those 15 years I’ve gone from MDI to a pump back to MDI back to a pump.  Here are a few interesting stats I’ve come up with…(yay, math!):

  • Today is my 5480th day with diabetes.
  • For the 26 total months I used MDI, that means I’ve given myself at least 3200 injections.  Don’t you dare complain to me about your yearly flu shot! 🙂
  • Assuming I check my blood sugar an average of 8 times a day, that is 43,840 finger sticks.  (Who wants to treat me to a manicure?)
  • I’ve gotten blood drawn for A1c Tests, thyroid monitoring, etc. about 60 times.  And it hasn’t gotten easier.
  • I’ve changed my pump site approximately 1550 times.  I still suck at doing it left-handed.
  • Zero.  That’s the number of times I’ve clobbered someone after they have made an uneducated, rude, ignorant comment about diabetes.  Do I get a prize for this?

Fifteen years.  That’s a long time.  That’s longer than most Hollywood marriages.  It’s been a hell of a ride with this whole diabetes thing.  It’s made me a stronger woman, more compassionate towards others, more patient, some days a little angry and blue, but mostly, I’ve just been me.  I don’t know any different and I think if you told me that there was a cure and I’d be able to live life free of a pump, finger sticks, and worrying about how that food/exercise/adult beverage/sleeping in will affect my blood sugar, it’d be an interesting adjustment period.  One that I would welcome, of course, but it’s hard to grasp the concept of a life without diabetes!  Could you imagine?  It has been such a big part of who I am, but not all that I am.  I am also a friend, a sister, wife, daughter, kickboxer when I’m not lazy, wine lover, cartographer, blogger, Phillies fan, pasta eater, aunt, volunteer, beer drinker, (Volunteer beer drinker? Sign me up!), Homeland watcher, employee, baker…I am not just a diabetic.  I am Laura.  There’s so much more to me than diabetes.

Invisible Illness Awareness Week 2013

Did you know that this week is Invisible Illness Week? I didn’t either until this blog post came across my reader. Thanks Rose!  I used to love filling out the old email surveys way back in the day, so why not? Here’s an easy chance to learn a little more about me and my diabetes. Don’t worry, there won’t be a quiz at the end.

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

1. The illness I live with is: Type 1 Diabetes

2. I was diagnosed with it in the year: 1998, 4 days after my 18th birthday!

3. But I had symptoms since: Not long before diagnosis. Maybe a month before? I lost weight (Yay!) and was peeing a lot (Non-yay when there wasn’t a bathroom on my floor in the dorms!) but I didn’t think anything of it.

4. The biggest adjustment I’ve had to make is: Testing my blood sugar, injecting insulin/wearing a pump, and carrying all the crap ever around – wherever I go.

5. Most people assume: That diabetes is just having to test my BG and taking insulin before meals. I don’t think people realize how serious it is and how I am constantly aware of what my BG is/how my body feels/how my actions affect my numbers.
Or, that my foot is going to fall off.

6. The hardest part about mornings are: Giving up cereal. My BG hates it. No matter how I try to bolus. I miss you Cocoa Puffs.

7. My favorite medical TV show is: Grey’s Anatomy. I’m one of the 4 people who still watch it.

8. A gadget I couldn’t live without is: My Dexcom CGM. Seriously my most favorite Diabetes device ever! I credit it for helping me get my a1c down to 6.8 and I always say I’ll give up my pump before I give up my Dexcom. It has given me a sense of security and much more awareness of my diabetes.

9. The hardest part about nights are: Deciding if I need a snack before bed. Seriously. Food is hard.

10. Each day I take __ pills & vitamins: 2 Pills – Sythroid and Vitamin. I’m usually on Vytorin but my doc took me off of it in preparation for baby making. Also, continuous insulin via the pump.

11. Regarding alternative treatments I: Think they have their place. Although, with T1D there really aren’t any alternatives to insulin. But I think there is nothing wrong with seeking out a natural treatment for more common ailments like the common cold if that’s what you choose.

12. If I had to choose between an invisible illness or visible I would choose: Invisible. I don’t like my diabetes being made a huge deal of and I imagine if I had a visible illness I would feel uncomfortable much more often.

13. Regarding working and career: I’ve been working in some capacity of another since before my diagnosis. I don’t think that Diabetes has affected my ability to get and keep a job. I’ve really only missed maybe 3 or 4 days of work because of wonky blood sugars. In 14 years, that’s not too bad. I do feel guilty sometimes for having to miss time for doctor’s appointments, but I supposed that is what PTO is for!

14. People would be surprised to know: We really don’t want to hear stories about how your best friend’s cat has diabetes, or that your uncle “died from diabetes” or that your former boss’s mother’s sister lost her foot because she was diabetic. Really. Not helpful.

15. The hardest thing to accept about my new reality has been: My reality isn’t really “new” but back in college, the toughest thing to accept was that this is permanent. At least for the next 5-7 years until there’s a cure, right?

16. Something I never thought I could do with my illness that I did was: I got nothing. Ask me again in a year or so and hopefully my answer will be “Have a baby.”

17. The commercials about my illness: Annoy me.

18. Something I really miss doing since I was diagnosed is: Eating without thought. I miss not having to test, figure out my insulin, not having to wonder how this meal/snack will make me feel in the next 15 minutes, hour, 3 hours, etc.

19. It was really hard to have to give up: One piece bathing suits and low cut dresses. Female pumpers will understand.  Oh, and cereal.  And money.  Diabetes is expensive, yo.

20. A new hobby I have taken up since my diagnosis is: Blogging. This is a really new hobby!

21. If I could have one day of feeling normal again I would: Eat all the pasta without a worry in the world.

22. My illness has taught me: A lot of stuff.

23. Want to know a secret? One thing people say that gets under my skin is: See number 14.

24. But I love it when people: Ask questions and actually listen when I explain what I live with, my pump and CGM, etc.

25. My favorite motto, scripture, quote that gets me through tough times is: Tomorrow will be a better day.

26. When someone is diagnosed I’d like to tell them: Diabetes is a pain in the ass, there’s no sense sugar coating it (Pun intended). But it is manageable and even though it seems like you are being inundated with information right now, in just a short amount of time, all of this will become second nature. You can do this. And if you feel like you can’t there are tons of people both online and in real life who are happy to support you, answer your questions, or listen if you need to vent.

27. Something that has surprised me about living with an illness is: That even though there are people around for support, it can be very isolating. That’s why I am so grateful for the DOC and IRL D-friends I have. They “get it”.

28. The nicest thing someone did for me when I wasn’t feeling well was: My college roommate took me to the hospital and sat with me for hours in the ER on what was a pretty useless ER visit (Something I could/should have handled on my own, another blog for another day). Also, my husband does nice things all the time – getting my meter for me, checking my CGM receiver when he thinks I’m not looking, grabbing me some juice, starting dinner when he’s not hungry yet so I can eat/won’t go low, etc. I’ll keep him.

29. I’m involved with Invisible Illness Week because: My blog isn’t so invisible, so why not?

30. The fact that you read this list makes me feel: Happy and hopeful that you weren’t terribly bored.

 

Have a great weekend, everyone!

Doomsday Preppers – Type 1 Diabetes Style

The other day my husband was poking around on the interwebs and came across a forum where someone was discussing “Prepping” with Type 1.  This prompted him to ask me if I had ever thought about it, which lead me to say I’d be screwed and he has permission to eat me should he ever need to.  We used to live in a hurricane prone area, so one would think that I’d be prepared but the great thing about hurricanes is…you usually know they are coming.  Of course, since the husband kinda digs me, he decided to come up with a plan should the crap hit the fan due to a fire, blizzard, alien invasion.  So, without further ado, here it is…

A Guest Post by Laura’s Husband

The funny title and all joking aside, I wanted to try to make an informative guest post about “prepping” – an often sensationalized topic in this day and age.  I wouldn’t say that Laura and I are “preppers” in the sense of the pop culture stigma.  However, I was a Boy Scout when I was a kid and as the motto goes – I like to “Be Prepared”.

In case you’ve seen it, please know that I don’t like the TV show “Doomsday Preppers”.  I think they highlight more of the eccentric personalities of prepping more than providing any useful real world education.  I am however a big fan of TV shows like “Lost, “Revolution” and movies like “Castaway”.   So I ask – What have you done to help prepare yourself or your loved ones for any real life emergencies related to the treatment of diabetes?  How about a situation like one that may come up on TV or in the movies?  Those are obviously the extreme and if you think about everything up to that extreme – you’ll be prepared for anything in between.

Preppers often organize their preparedness into a number of different “bags”.  I thought it would be good to create a quick primer on these different types of bags and some of the situations where you might like to have them with you.

Day Bag
This is most often your purse, a small backpack, or a laptop case – something that you have with you at all times.  Men – this is not a “man purse”, it’s a satchel.  Indiana Jones wears one.

Most T1 diabetics are already great at keeping their “Day Bag” stocked out of necessity.  Obviously you’d keep your daily insulin, meter & test strips, syringes, alcohol swabs, pens, tips, and glucose tablets here.  Laura likes to keep some small snack foods in her purse, such as a granola bar or a rice crispy treat.  Maybe some small candies like Smarties.  Not ideal ways to treat lows, but there if you need them.

Get Home Bag

I like to think of this bag as the bag that gets you through the 12 hours you get trapped in your car on the interstate during an ice storm.  This isn’t something that happens often where we live, but when it does happen every few years it is crippling.  This is a bag that is kept in the trunk of your car.

Related to the D, this bag might have a reservoir, an infusion set, more syringes, lancets, more pens and tips, some extra pump batteries, maybe a spare meter and test strips.  If you’re not carrying your Glucagon in your Day Bag, one would be here and you would tell everyone that its there.  This would also be a good place to have more snacks and maybe a few bottles of Coca-Cola and obviously bottled water.  This is an area where some extra care is needed, especially in the dog days of summer where a soda might explode due to the intense heat.  I don’t care what Mythbusters said, it is totally possible.

Since folks may not be used to having a bag like this in their car, this bag might also have some things like comfortable shoes, extra layers of clothes, gloves, hat, sunscreen, headlamp / flashlight, knife / multitool, dust mask / handkerchiefs, matches / lighter, extra money (around $100 recommended), etc, etc, etc.  Laura currently works about 9 miles from our house.  This bag should have the supplies needed to literally walk those 9 miles home if needed.

Bug Out Bag
The one that gets made fun of the most… but be honest – if your house caught fire, do you have a bag ready to go at a moments notice that will help you survive the next 48 to 72 hours related to T1D?

One of the best things you can have in this bag is a copy of all your prescriptions and a thumb USB drive with your health insurance and medical information.  Next is some cash and a credit card to begin replacing anything you might need, refilling those prescriptions, etc.  In this bag are also more infusion sets, extra sensors for your CGM, an extra charger for your CGM if you have one, more batteries, more Glucose tablets, more syringes and most importantly – Insulin.  Unfortunately insulin is the biggest challenge with prepping for someone with T1D.  It’s recommended to stay cold, has an expiration date, and once opened needs to be used in a month or so.  This bag should have a small cooler or something like an insulated lunch box for your insulin.

The exit plan from your house is completely dependent on the situation at hand, but if time allows there are 3 stops that are made and all can be done in less than a few seconds.

1) Grab the B.O.B. (obviously the bag, not the fun times B.O.B., but hey, I’m not one to judge your priorities)

2) Grab insulin from the fridge and ice packs from freezer.

3) Grab important papers from the safe such as passports / birth certificates.

In a fire, I might be able to make those 3 stops… maybe not.  Obviously, get yourself and loved ones out if the situation is dire.  But if I didn’t have that bag prepared, there would be many more than 3 stops and probably no chance at making them.

Long Term / Permanency
It’s obviously not likely that something like “Revolution” will ever really develop… but if it did, there would be some significant challenges related to T1D.  Test strips run out, there is no way to keep insulin cool, it also runs out, etc.  Unfortunately, we don’t have the means to buy a ~1 year supply of T1D treatment supplies to keep a stockpile… but it might make sense to try to stockpile expired insulin or those old test strips and meters from the brands you didn’t like or the insurance company stopped covering.  If you find an expired vial, don’t throw it away… clearly mark it and save it.  It may not be as potent as fresh stuff, but if you’re at the end of the rope and your life depended on it – wouldn’t it be better to try than nothing?

For many reasons, I used to think about getting Laura a diabetes alert dog.  Though now that she has a CGM, I don’t really think about it.  Again – it’s extreme from a prepping perspective, but without test strips an alert dog might be a way to help monitor blood sugar.  Unfortunately, you then run into the challenge of needing to prep for your dog!  This won’t be something we really explore as we don’t have the funds to properly train a service animal and with the price and availability of CGM it simply doesn’t make much sense financially.

We’ll save the discussion of burying a cache of insulin somewhere out in the woods for next time.  Just kidding about that last part, but as you can see – being prepared never ends.  You don’t need to be a Doomsday Prepper, but any step you can take to make sure you can take care of yourself in an emergency is a positive step to being prepared!

If anyone has suggestions on better T1D preps, please leave a comment below.  Insulin is by far the area where more thought and consideration is needed.

Until next time…

Laura’s Husband

So, as you can see, my husband is definitely the planner in the relationship.  I even ran out of insulin the other day, so should the crap hit the fan, I’d likely panic or forget something of major importance.  I think it’s a great idea to have a bag ready to go with a week’s worth of supplies that you can just grab and go.  This is something I’ll be organizing in the coming weeks.

Flat tires, dead sensors, and clueless people…

Oh my!

This past weekend the husband and I traveled to our hometown for a bridal shower and bachelor/bachelorette parties for a wedding we are both in.  The 7 hour car ride up was pretty un-eventful, my blood sugar behaved for the most part.  However, once we arrived my one day old sensor started misbehaving.  It wasn’t giving me a trend arrow and was telling me I was in the 40s when actually I was 184.  I was hoping it’d come back to life, but after an hour or so of this naughty behavior, I got the question marks of death so I yanked it.  Kind of a bummer because I didn’t want to have to deal with the first 24 hours of sensor inaccuracy during the shower and bachelorette party, but, such is a Diabetic’s life.

The shower was lovely, however when I went out to my car to leave, I noticed a flat tire.  Oh boy.  Luckily my in-laws live only a few miles from where the shower was held so I was able to get my car there and they went out of their way to get a new tire for me.  I am so grateful for them for doing this and giving up their entire Saturday afternoon to solve my problem.  They are wonderful!

The bachelorette party was fun – we went to dinner at a Hibachi style restaurant.  However, we did a lot more walking than I anticipated so I was low for a good hour.  This led to one of the women making a comment about me eating a couple of cookies.  Something along the lines of “I can’t believe you’re eating.  Aren’t you full???”  ARGH.  I said that my blood sugar was low and rather than pass out, I had to force a few cookies down my throat even though we just ate.

This same woman also told me her grandfather “died of diabetes”, so as you can imagine my patience with her was wearing thin.  I will never understand why people think that in order to relate to your disease they have to tell a horror story of someone who died from complications or lost a foot or whatever.  These stories are NOT helpful.

I did face a few D-related decisions over the weekend.  To prevent my CGM alarm from going off at the shower since I knew I’d be eating a lot and it would be a guessing game as to how much to bolus, I turned the high alert off.  I stayed in the low to mid 200s pretty much all day, which, not good.  But, it is what it is.  Hindsight is telling me I probably should have done a temp basal, but live and learn!

While getting ready to head out for the bachelorette party I had to decide if I should bring my meter or CGM as both did not fit in my small, going-out purse.  I chose my meter since I was still within the first 24 hours of my sensor and, well, I trust my meter more.

All-in-all it was a good weekend.  Traveling is just tough with diabetes.  This weekend I’m going to visit my dear friend in NYC and I am determined to have a good blood sugar weekend.  I think it will be much easier since I’m obviously much more comfortable with her than I am with a group of women I’ve only met once.  I have my endo appointment on the 14th and I don’t want last weekend and this coming weekend to mess up my a1c!

I have a special guest blog post coming tomorrow, written by the husband.  Stay tuned!

The day I lost it at the grocery store…

Yesterday I had a little bit of excitement at the grocery store.  As I was on my way there, I was chatting with my sister on my phone and we were mid-convo when I arrived so I hung out in the car for a bit to finish up our conversation.  Went into Kroger and after about 20 minutes, my sister texts me that my nephew had received the picture I drew for him (he sent my husband and I a picture in the mail so of course I had to draw him one, because what 5-year-old kid doesn’t love getting mail!?)  Anyway, according to my nephew, my picture was “Impressive”.  Ha!  Want to know what’s not so impressive?  Going to check your CGM and realizing, shit.  It’s not there.

Commence Panic.

OK, maybe it’s in my purse? I actually had the thought to throw it in my purse while I was on the phone with my sister.  I dump out the contents of my purse (which, as any D Lady knows, we don’t carry purses.  We carry Mary Poppins’ bag.  Picture a panicking lady dumping her purse into her shopping cart.  Yeah.)  Not there.

Shit.

I retraced my steps all while freaking out… OMG, we can’t afford to pay full price for a new one.  What if someone sees it and thinks it’s an iPod and swipes it?  WHY have I been dragging my feet on making a label to put on it, explaining that it’s a medical device, reward if found, OMG I suck at life.  Ohmygod, Ohmygod, Ohmygod.

My heart was racing.  After not seeing it in the spots I had been, I go to the customer service counter, nearly crying, asking if it had been turned in and if they will make an announcement.  The woman does, but of course her announcement makes zero sense.  (Really how do you explain what a CGM is to someone who has no idea?).

I’m freaking the hell out.  Texting with my husband and panicking.  I said about 9,000 prayers to St. Anthony (who usually is listening when I lose stuff!).  As a last-ditch effort I think that maybe it fell off while I was walking into the store, maybe, just maybe the Diabetes-Gods will smile upon me and it wasn’t run over.  I ditch my half full cart in the produce section and head out to my car.

Don’t see it in the parking lot.  Fuuuuuuuuu……dge.   Maybe it’s in my car??  Please, please, please, let it be there.  I open the door…and….

FOUND IT.  It was in between my seat and my door.

Biggest sigh of relief ever.

I sent my husband a text that said “FOU D IT”, which he was able to decipher as “FOUND IT” (he’s so smart).  He wrote back that he was in his truck on his way to the store.  (I should’ve made him come and finish up the grocery shopping, cuz man, I needed a beer or something at this point!).

Friends, I was freaked the hell out for a good 30 minutes.  I rely so much on this device and should I lose it and can’t get it replaced under warranty, right now it just wouldn’t be in the cards to replace.  My heart is still racing.

Lesson learned.  Unless I am at home or at work, my Dexcom will stay securely IN something.  In my purse, my boxing bag, cup holder of my car.  The clip it comes with really just isn’t the best and I really do not want to have to have a panic attack at Kroger again.

Laura Fun Fact – I played Jane Banks in my Kindergarten production of Mary Poppins.  On video, there is a shot of me on stage , butt to the crowd, picking a massive wedgie.  I was a classy little kid.

Happy Diabetes Blog Check-In Day, everyone!

Let Freedom Ring!

Happy Independence Day, my American friends.  One day I hope those of us living with and loving someone with Diabetes can celebrate our own Independence Day.  Imagine…

  • Freedom from having to test your blood sugar multiple times per day.
  • Freedom from worrying about the carbs in your meal and feeling guilty if you go over your recommended threshold.
  • Freedom from injections or wearing an insulin pump.
  • Freedom from bruises on your belly, arms, butt…
  • Freedom from being nervous to exercise.
  • Freedom to wear a dress without having to figure out where to put your pump.
  • Freedom from the “Can you eat that?”, “My uncle had diabetes and his foot fell off” comments.
  • Freedom from having to go over a company’s medical benefits with a fine tooth comb before accepting an offer.
  • Freedom from having to budget your monthly medical costs.
  • Freedom from 900 million doctors appointments every year.
  • Freedom from having to plan your pregnancy years before you want to actually get pregnant.
  • Freedom from wearing gadgets and robot parts.
  • Freedom from these robot parts beeping and vibrating at the most inopportune times.
  • Freedom from turning down or not initiating intimacy because you feel sick.
  • Freedom from second guessing your decisions regarding your meal choices, insulin dosage, activity level…
  • Freedom from guilt when your blood sugar is higher than you’d like.
  • Freedom from having to lug around all the diabetes crap everywhere you go.
  • Freedom from smelling like band aids.
  • Freedom from wondering if every tummy ache or head ache is related to your blood sugar.
  • Freedom from pump tubing getting caught on doorknobs.
  • Freedom from that “I feel sorry for you” look when someone finds out you have diabetes.
  • Freedom from glucose tablets.
  • Freedom from having to pack half a suitcase of diabetes supplies for a weekend trip.
  • Freedom from middle of the night low blood sugars that leave you feeling the “low hangover” the following day.
  • Freedom from having to take a moment to treat a low.
  • Freedom from your medical alert bracelet getting in your way.

Here’s to our hopeful future freedom!  Happy Independence Day!

D Meetup!

Last night I had the pleasure of meeting up with some local women who I happen to have something in common with – we all have Type 1!  Being new-ish to the area, it was so nice to meet some nice women and share stories.  We chatted about diabetes, jobs, life, etc.  Hula-hoops even made an appearance (although mine spent the majority of the time on the ground, I am not skilled in this area!)  Lots of laughs were shared and I am looking forward to our next get together!  Thank you so much to our kind host for having us!

A Day in the Life, My #DayofDiabetes

Wow.  I don’t think I could have picked a worse day for my Twitter #DayofDiabetes.  Typically, my blood sugars behave fairly well.  Sure, I’ll have some ups and downs, but last Wednesday was a day full of all ups and all downs.  There was no stability at all.  I am quite embarrassed that this was the day I chose to share on Twitter, however, it just goes to show that Diabetes really will sometimes do what it wants despite our best efforts.

Overnight leading in to my day, I had a blood sugar of 43.  This is pretty low and even though I usually wake up on my own from my lows, it wasn’t until my Dexcom alarmed that I woke up.  I have no idea how long it was alarming for, but I sure am glad for that little device.

In typical overnight-low-blood-sugar fashion, I treated it with everything that could fit into my mouth (cereal, and more cereal, oh, and why not, some more cereal!).  Why is it so hard to stick to the 15-15-15 rule (Consume 15 grams of carbohydrates, wait 15 minutes, and your BG should come up 15) when you’re low, specifically when these lows are overnight and you also have half-asleep grogginess to contend with?  After I started to recover from my low, I even had the sense to give myself a small bolus because I knew that after eating the entire box a large bowl (or two) of corn flakes, I was bound to go high and honestly, I didn’t want to have to listen to my Dexcom beeping all night.  And I didn’t want to wake up with a high blood sugar in the morning.

In the morning, I learned that my plan failed:

wakeuptweet

Decided to wait on eating breakfast (except for coffee.  Gotta have my coffee) and gave myself a bolus to bring my sugar down and cover the sugar-free creamer in my coffee.  As I usually level out by noon with these “over correction” highs, I still packed my gym bag in anticipation that I’d be going to boxing that evening.
AMbolustweet
After a couple of hours, my blood sugar still hadn’t come down so I gave myself a mini-bolus of 1.05U to try to get it to come down before lunch.  I always get nervous about stacking my insulin like that but it was being so super stubborn!
tweet2
Back to our regularly scheduled programming of working, despite feeling icky from the extended high blood sugar.  A couple of hours later, my sugar had slightly come down.  Time to bolus for lunch!
tweetlunch
Lunch wasn’t exactly the best and I broke my “No Lean Cuisines” goal for this week but sometimes you’re just rushing in the morning and don’t have time to make something.  And dealing with the “low, then high” hangover in the mornings doesn’t exactly make you feel energized and ready to take on the day.  Despite my not so hot Diabetes Day, I still was committed to entering my food into My Fitness Pal.  Yay for persistence?
mfp
I had hoped that after lunch, my blood sugar would come down.  Nope.
afterlunch
😦 But, with diabetes you must have a sense of humor!
390
One of the best things about the Diabetes Online Community is the sense of support you get from people who “get it”.
worldsworst
friend
friend2
Thanks for the support, ladies!  I needed it that day.  Badly.
Finally, after a few hours, my blood sugar came down.  Although not far enough and I made the decision to skip (Sky?) the gym.
skipgym
At the suggestion of another twitter friend, I did a 200% basal rate for the remainder of the afternoon.  Finally, when I got home from work it appeared that my blood sugar decided it wanted to play nicely.
falling
Or maybe not.
crashlandingI had dinner (turkey sausage, steamed squash and zucchini, egg noodles – yum!) and my blood sugar returned to normal.
tempelevation
For a few minutes, at least.
bg59
Hey, at least I got to eat dessert guilt free, right?  I was happy that evening was the weekly Diabetes Social Media Advocacy Twitter Chat.  I’m so happy that I discovered this weekly chat, and although sometimes it is hard to keep up for this newbie Twitter-er, it’s a great weekly event that I’ve enjoyed tremendously!  That night it was an open chat (usually the administrators ask 5 questions that we all answer) and I enjoyed getting to know some of my DOC friends better.  It also distracted me from my icky day.
DSMA
Finally, it was time for bed.  I was exhausted after the many ups and downs of my day of diabetes.  *yawn*
goodnight
What a day!
dayofdiabetes


Things I learned from my Day of Diabetes…

  • Diabetes never behaves how you want it to.  I had hoped that my Day of Diabetes would be one of those perfect days where my post meal spikes were below 180 and I stayed right around 110 all day.  Sadly, that didn’t happen.
  • BUT my day did reflect the frustrations that come with Diabetes.  Every day is different.  You can do the same exact thing 2 days in a row and get different results.  The key with dealing with it is to be patient and remember that tomorrow is a new day.
  • The Diabetes Online Community is great.  The support received from other people with diabetes is immeasurable.
  • Temporary basal rates are our friend.  I tend to always have a knee-jerk reaction to highs and bolus, bolus, bolus when I really need to use temporary basal rates so I don’t have those horrible crash landings.
  • If I always tweeted every Diabetes-related action or thought, I’d probably have zero twitter friends.  🙂
  • Every day is a day of diabetes.  And every day is a chance to learn something new about the disease and yourself.

HOB = Hubs On Board.

The Hubs and I email pretty frequently throughout the day.  On Friday afternoon, I was emailing him about some of the comments I received on my most recent Friday Fives post encouraging me to take a pregnancy test due to my wonky sugars.

Me:  Some of my internet friends are encouraing me to pee on a stick.  You’d die.

Hubs:  No, I would not have a premature death.

Me:  You’d poop your pants.  

Hubs:  I would not lose control of my bowels.

Me:  You’d vomit.

Hubs: I would not have an upset stomach.

So perhaps if I was pregnant, his level of freak out would be minimal.  We aren’t planning on trying for some time, gotta get the A1C in check, so it would be quite a shock.  I really do not think I am as we take proper precautions, I think I just had a really bad couple of diabetes days.

Still, he makes me giggle.  I kinda like him.

download (2)

Friday Five, 6/7

  • Running high for the past few days, changed pump site with 50 units of insulin left (HATE wasting insulin!), of course I pick a spot where I sit down and my jeans dig into it.  Site change fail.  At least it’s forcing me to sit up straight.  My mom would be so proud.
  • I picked the worst diabetes day I’ve had in a long time for my #dayofdiabetes on Twitter.  I still can’t figure out how to insert tweets into WordPress to make a pretty blog so I can summarize it.  Help?
  • It’s free donut day at Dunkin!  I was pleasantly surprised when I went to get my friday coffee and have enjoyed half of my chocolate glazed donut and am saving the other half for after lunch.  I really rock at dieting.  (Don’t worry, I’m counting the calories!)
  • Had my fourth overnight low in a row last night.  Very odd as my overnight sugars thus far have been great with my new pump.
  • I don’t understand this.  Is the lotion diabetic?  Wouldn’t it make more sense to be “Skin Relief lotion for diabetics?”
    diabeticlotion

    I sure hope this lotion gets it’s a1c in check.

    Have a great weekend!!!